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-terrorist official tells the u.s. to focus -- economic targets like banks and stock exchanges. at the same time, developments on the battlefields in afghanistan and pakistan that are linked to the plot, apparently. here are key points. authorities say a german citizen of afghan descent is in custody spelling out the terror plan, like the terror plot in mumbai that killed 164 people two years ago. osama bin laden apparently approved the plan. no word so far if threats were also made against the united states. now, to the war zone in afghanistan and pakistan. nato says an air strike killed a top al qaeda commander in northern afghanistan along its border with pakistan. the u.s. recently increased the number of drone attacks in pakistan, and this may be due in part to information on the terror plot. drone targets in pakistan include taliban and al qaeda forces and militants linked to al qaeda. and the taliban denied claims made by the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, general david petraeus, that the taliban wants, was in contact with afghan government officials about possible peace talks. there'
'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
again. that saving that they are doing is going to help us in the future as we reinvest and stabilize and grow out of this. host: you do get more information logging onto nsba.b is -- jeff from florida. good morning. caller: i have a questn and a concern. theatriot long for veterans. wondering if there is any activity for met -- patriot loan. guest: in terms of? caller: loaning down to usf veterans. host: you need to start business? caller: to gain some monetary to help us of parrot guest: as i am sure you know, there are a number of programs through the re sba to help veterans. senator kerry is to be chairman of the commanding, and was a lead in veterans business issues and did put together that bill. i have to go back and see where things stand with passage right now. but we certainly have been supportive of efforts to get more cash into the hands of both the veterans businesses and all small businesses. host: upstate, new york -- upstate new york, binghamton. caller: i just wanted to say that i am amazed at the ignorance of this administration. you are postulating now that small bu
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
this morning is what is america's core competency in your mind. if you would like to tell us how that can be nurtured by our leaders, we would like to hear that as well where we are going to get to your calls right away if we can get our producers to get some calls on the line while we are talking to you about america's core competency. we went to wikipedia which, as you know, is the self edited by people all rumble world really -- all are around the world really. we want to give you some statistics about the united states for its land mass. over 3.79 million square miles. 300 million people. the united states is the third or fourth largest country by a total area and the third largest both by land area of population. it is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multi- cultural nations, the product of a large-scale immigration from many countries. the u.s. economy is the world's largest national gdp of $14.30 trillion and a quarter of the nominal global gdp and one-fifth of the gdp at purchasing power parity. that is the size and the economics of the united states. one of the poss
're on our twittergate. pat is joining us on the republican line from maryland. caller: i did not understand the agency that the recession was over. host: it is a group of economists. they said the recession ended in june of 2009. caller: obviously, they are not traveling around the country. if you will take a look at what is happening -- i go to hoses every day of people. in an insurance agent. i speak with people lost their jobs and their wives have lost their jobs as well. their children are dropping out of school. making $9 an hour to support their families. mr. obama is way off when it comes to understanding what's going on in the country. what is going on is more jobs are being lost. we just lost 12 of hundred more jobs at the steel plant in this city. 700 more jobs at the company that brings the food in for the two stadiums in baltimore city. another company just went bust. that was 1500 jobs. this is every single week for a new place is closing. you cannot tell me there is the recession over. the recession is going to last. i think it's gone to last another two years or three years.
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
for our schools at the time of crisis for our country. follow us on twitter. up next, tom brokaw right here. >>> held loaf. i would like to welcome you to our education nation summit. it's our children, our grandchildren. representing nothing less than our future and the 3.1 million teachers in the united states, those who help meld our children into future businessmen, engineers, politicians, teachers, whatever we are begins in the american classroom, but there is a problem just over the horizon. many of our teachers and principals are part of the baby boom generation. in fact, a study conducted by the national commission on teaching and the future found more than one many of our nation's veteran teachers and principals will be retiring over the next decade. a wave of retirlt expected to reach its peak sometime during this school year. so today we're going to talk about solutions to this this problem. joining me here at rockefeller center is secretary of education arne duncan. how he hopes to fill the classrooms with a new generation of educators. over the next hour the secretary will
third parties and subsequently use in your operations? >> we've put in a full array of testing. we're taking samples from every incoming load. we've talked to all of our vendors for them also to do testing. we're doing a composite on these loads weekly and send them in for testing. we're going to do a monthly swabbing of our feed mill. we are currently in the process of completely cleaning and disinfecting the entire mill from top to bottom. and we've done extensive employee training to make sure that the mill is kept tightened up so that there's no open hatches as noted in the 483. >> what steps do you take to ensure that those planned or announced safeguards are implemented? >> we have a daily inspection by the mill manager. then we have an outside supervisor who is going to inspect the facilities once a week and give me a full report. >> do you still have your hog operations? >> we own some hog facilities but we don't own any -- we don't operate hog facilities. we just lease them. >> i see. mr. chairman, i note with some distress my time is up, and i thank you for your courtesy.
us to the edge with wall street. i keep saying to voters that they need to keep pushing and keep the democrats in their. keep pushing, folks. host: you can join the conversation online, the twittered page is twitter.com/c- spanwj. or you can send us an e-mail and journal@c-span.org. we welcome our listeners that listen to was on radio. this is from the weekend edition of "the wall street journal." host: one final point from her -- "what is the mainstream media getting wrong in getting right? of the media does not appreciate how livid people are with washington." host: by the way, new polls are showing barbara boxer ahead in california. matt dillon says from arlington, texas, good morning, welcome to "washington journal." caller: thank you for taking my call. i just wanted to comment on how the movement that the tea party has, gosh, we are just tired all the losses and misplaced promises that the people always seem to give us. we had a grassroots movement for everyone. republicans, democrats, and tea party yeariers. this new financial reform bill has nothing to do with that, they
talk about a meeting in september of 2009, when the word traditional was used, what were the words she used to your recollection? >> the ones i have a mile written statement. >> would you refer to the words he said she specifically said? -- you said she specifically said? >> that is page 13. the bottom of page 13, the top of page 14. >> i have a larger print. >> mr. chairman, would you mind if the answer that question? thank you. >> ok. >> my recollection is that she used the term traditional types of section two cases, and the terms of political equality for racial and language minority groups, and the term "that is what we are all about." >> ok. thank you. >> ok, if that is your answer. >> thank you. in the last round of questioning you answered yes to my question of did anyone at that meeting where you were participating by conference ez about theer ri race hostile opposition to the boating rights act. were you one of the people who told him? >> yes. i remember specifically say in it because i knew about his testimony in front of congress, and i wanted mr. perez to know that i stron
week we have legislation. it is important for us to make things here in america. we have always been good at that. in making it in america, it lets people make it in america. maybe by now you may know that the senate is passing the small business credit bill. i understand it was imminent when we came down here. when they do, this legislation will help to create 500,000 jobs. it will reduce taxes is for small businesses. s and as we get the bill, -- we think we have some better ideas. the republicans in the senate have held it up. some of these issues will have to be in future legislation because small businesses cannot wait another day for this to be passed. i think it is important to know that august is officially over. in the first eight months of this year, the economy has produced more private-sector jobs than the eight years of the bill should ministration. more private sector jobs created in the first eight months of 2010 banned in eight years of the bush administration. we are here to preserve social security, tax cuts for the middle-class, we are not going back. we are here t
is by former u.s. attorney general michael mukasey. again, president obama will have an announcement this afternoon in the white house rose garden. we will have coverage at 1:30 p.m. eastern. until then, an author who has written a book critical of the obama administration. ng this friday, september 17, david limbaugh returns. his latest book is called "crimes against liberty: an indictment of president barack obama." as with the start -- start our discussion, for an author, had a new spirit of the lettuce nonfiction best-seller list. "the new york times" as the book and a number one spot, the second week on the list. "wall street journal" nonfiction, number two. and the combined list of fiction and nonfiction books at "usa today" #28, moving up and not -- #30. why is is selling so well? guest: i think it is resonating. people in america are very scared about what is going on about the bankrupting spending the federal government is doing and the destruction of our liberties and the assaults of individual liberties and assaults on the states, the war against the state, how president o
morning washington." we are glad you are joining us. i'm alison starling. we'll have traffic and weather in just a moment. first, a quick heats up for students in ann arundel county. chesapeake high, chesapeake bay middle, and folger mckinley elementary will be closed due to a broken water pipe. >>> now time for traffic and weather. adam caskey has the first check on the forecast. we had a gorgeous weekend, adam. maybe we can hang on to that. >> high temperatures in the upper 70's yesterday. the average high temperature is 78. we run a little above average. today will be a little cooler and closer to normal. right now we're in the 60's, which is above average for morning temperatures. our average low is 61 at reagan national. 68 in springfield. hamilton 65. culpeper at 65 degrees. temperatures will likely drop a couple more degrees before the sun comes up at 6 cht 54 -- 6:54 a.m. north wind at 5 to 15. we'll drop the humidity throughout the day today. it's 5:01. let's go to lisa. >>> it has been smooth on the outer loop of the beltway. construction barrels should be on the sh
careful, methodical. i have a tremendous team of law enforcement working with us and i'm confident we'll be able to be successful. >> abuelazam pled not guilty today. >>> we have the condition of a doctor shot at hopkins last week. orthopedic surgeon david cohen is in good condition and continues to improve. he was shot by the son of an elderly patient being treated at the hospital last thursday. police say the gunman, 50-year- old paul warren pardus became distraught after being told about his mother's condition and he shot and killed his mother and then himself. >>> the only woman on virginia death row, the only way theresa lewis will survive is a reprieve from the district court. she is set to be the first one executed in the state in nearly a century. she was convicted of conspiring with two men to carry out the 2002 murders of her husband and stepson. her execution is scheduled for thursday. >>> it's been six months since a hunter discovered the body of a young woman buried in a remote corner of montgomery county. today tanessa taylor's family pleaded for answers. police want to
for granted on a daily basis to live in freedom, to live in democracy. those are the ones who allow us to do. that today we have the opportunity to help make our soldiers and our veterans, to help transition them into civilian life much easier. h.r. 5282 will help to make opportunities available to the brave men and women who are returning from the fight on the global war on terror and this legislation will continue our commitment to our veterans through education and employment opportunities. and as part of the civil works mission, the corps of engineers, they uncover countless historic artifacts continuously. a lot of these artifacts, which are very important items, are frankly just uncatalogged and are just kind of almost semiabandoned and they need curation. so, this is such a commonsense bill. it helps preserve our history, preserve our past, while also making sure that we give opportunities to the most noble, to the best and the brightest of our country, to our troops and to our veterans. i urge all members to support our receipt advance and support this -- our veterans and support thi
leads on them? >> reporter: police are telling us that both shannon watkins and casey boone were involved in prostitution and that watkins, who is 34 years old, was known to frequent prince george's county as well as the alexandria virginia area. as for boone, she is 20 years old and was known to frequent the alexandria area. at this point police are not calling them suspects but persons of interest and say they may have information on this case and right now they want to find them and interview them. >> sherri ly reporting live for us. thank you. >>> take a good look at this picture. prince george's county police need your help finding this man. they say he robbed an m&t bank in college park last thursday. if you recognize him, give police a call. you do not have to leave your name. >>> a warning now to students at the university of maryland following yet another robbery just off campus. it happened early sunday morning in the parking lot of the college park shopping center on baltimore avenue. the victim says three young men came up behind him, attacked him and robbed him. ther
of the image. >> too bad tony harris is off. he could show us a few moves. thank you, josh. very good advice. take heart, gentlemen, if you want to be sexy. >> move that wrist is shoulder. >> there's no saving you, so let's move on. the big stories for wednesday, september 8th, and it is a big day -- >> still feels really surreal. >> it doesn't sink in until we have visual confirmation by us. it's hard to sink in. >> they are about to get it sunken in, dozens of colorado families wait to see if their homes are still standing. one family wondering where their son's wedding will be next week as out of control fires tear through canyons outside of boulder. >>> president obama, anything to get the economy moving, and with the announcement later today, expect a fair amount of swiping at republicans. >>> for the first time on new york television, the new york imam behind the islamic center and mosque near ground zero. hear why he plans to go ahead with it. >> good morning, i'm drew griffin. tony harris is off today. those stories and your comments right here right now in the cnn newsroom. >>> 100
's primary results. zero be on your screen. joining us this morning from our news desk is steve peoples from "roll call." let us begin with the headline from the delaware newspaper, anti-establishment insurgency rocks of delaware. o'donnell in shocker. tea party-backed candidates funds. how would she be able to do it? guest: not surprised here. the tea party express came into town against the wishes of some people in washington. spent a lot of money. in a closed republican primary was able to make a difference and up said cassell. honestly hard to see this as anything but a nightmare scenario for the gop, at least in this delaware race. you heard karl rove right off the race and both people on both sides are doing the same thing. host: people did not think she could win this primary, either. guest: two different races. winning a closed republican primary which -- i looked at the numbers, about 60,000 people voted, about one-tenth of all registered voters in delaware. about one third of registered republicans. a very small sample. you get enough of your friends and the excited base out, you c
freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 million each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. according to the g.a.o., 8% of the service members let go under don't ask, don't tell held critical occupations defined as services such as interpreters, 3% had skills in an important foreign language such as arabic, farsi or korean. more than 13,000 troops have been dismissed from the military simply because of their sexual orientation since president clton signed this law in 1993. mr. president, soci
's will thomas tacks us to frederick, maryland for this one. -- takes us to frederick, maryland for this one. >> reporter: urbana public library. a thousand people a day pass through here but it is what a collection supervisor discovered outside in the book drop friday that prompted frederick county official to spring into action. >> we were especially fortunate because our circulation supervisor would was doing that task used to work in the hospitality industry so she was trainedded and looking for exactly this kind of bug. >> reporter: elizabeth cromwell is the community relations manager for frederick county libraries. bed bugs discovered in books? that is a first. >> i've been here eight years. i've never heard of. this my director has never heard of this either. >> reporter: this is about one of a half dozen bed bugs collected from one of the children's books in the drop on heat advisory bin. those books are now sitting in the back of this truck baking. once the temperature reaches # 20 degrees it kills any remaining bugs. >> i think it is disgusting and i hope that they do
're the belongings of a woman who was evicted from her apartment. 9news reporter kristin fisher joins us now with her story. good morning, kristin. >> reporter: good morning, andrea. so often we hear these stories of eviction and foreclosure taking place across the country but it's very rare to actually see somebody's personal struggle literally spread out on the sidewalk for all to see and that's unfortunately what has happened this morning. take a look. these are all of louisa diaz's belongings. she's 50 years old from venezuela and her stuff is literalliy packed up four or five feet high fun walked with me over here take a look at this. it's not just one street, or one side of the street where this stuff is. it's spread out all the way down the street. look way down there. it spreads out for three more blocks this way and it's all being guarded by a d.c. police officer and the reason he's here is because we're awaiting some trucks to come and take all of her stuff away. louisa has been in the united states for 22 years. she's been in her home, which is just in that block right there. she'
. >>> courage in the face of illness. our own dr. sanjay gupta gives us a taste of his new series. "the human factor." an interview with michael j. fox. >>> two former top chef contestants join me here to teach you how to be a top cook in your home. >>> first, big story for you now. two young men with very different outcomes from cyber bullying. no one -- one is not commenting right now. the other one committed suicide. meet tyler clementi, a freshman at rutgers university in new jersey. his family says he died after jumping off the george washington bridge into the hudson river. two fellow students, dharun ravi and molly wei are charged with invasion of privacy after allegedly putting a camera into the 18-year-old's dorm room without his knowledge and broadcasting elements of -- broadcasting his sexual encounters. ravi, the one student who's been charged, was tyler's roommate. he's believed to have sent out this twitter post, reading, quote, roommate asked for the room till midnight. i went into molly's room and turned on my web cam. i saw him making out with a dude. yay. now meet chris arms
and the same question people keep asking us, why hasn't his boss fired him? we'll put that question to his boss, the attorney general of michigan. >>> and a campaign ad re-enacting a senator's alleged visit with a prostitute. is it fair? is it true? >>> and later a rare sitdown with michael j. fox, his battle with parkinson's, what his days look like and what the future looks like in the battle against this killer disease. >>> keeping this honest, new developments in one of the oddest stories we have reported on in a long, long time. new calms tonight for an assistant attorney general of michigan to be fired. in a moment we're going to talk with his boss, the attorney general of michigan, to find out if he will be. let's first get you up to speed. the man we're talking about is andrew shirvell, assistant attorney general of michigan. for months in his private time he's been fixated on a young gay college student named chris armstrong. that's mr. armstrong. he's the first openly gay student body president at the university of michigan. so why does andrew shirvell care about chris armstrong? that
today, largely because it's not very useful. the white house released the president's speech yesterday so everybody could get their head around it and read it in advance. president obama doesn't always stick to the script, but we have a general sense what he'll say. as we wait for the president to begin we're going to tell you about some of the focus points of his speech. now, joining us to talk about it, we've got good people here who know a lot about education. first of all, our cnn education contributor steve perry on the left of the screen in hartford, connecticut. with me here no new york, tony mullen, teaches at-risk students. here with me. he was the 2009 teacher of the year. national teacher of the year. cnn suzanne malveaux is with the president in philadelphia and senior correspondent ed henry at the white house. let me start with steve. steve, what's your sense of what the president is going to say and what value this is going to bring to students and, of course, not just the students across the country who will hear him but their parents and teachers, more importantly? >> w
log on now. >> tomorrow, will arnett joins us, star of a new show on fox and glenn beck, star of his show on fox. >> and jane from "30 rock." have a fabulous monday, everyone. see you tomorrow. bill: one pepet there? kidding. good morning, everybody, thousands forced from their homes as a wildfire rages in the west, heightened security in the east, a lot to talk about on this monday. i'm bill hemmer. martha: good morning, ibm, i'm doing well, good to see you this monday, hi everybody, i'm martha maccallum. black hawk helicopters called in as flames hit salt lake city. >> we had fires out here but not this close. >> it was scary, getting close. martha: live report on that. bill: a surprise winner for 2012, how about indiana's mike pence winning that vote? what was his message? he's here in a moment to tell us exactly what he said. martha: new york is under tight security this morning as presidents and prime ministers and controversial leaders from around the world gather in the big apple to start off the united nations summit. iran is also there, always good for a shoeubging st
chairs. there's also an important warning to parents of newborns who use popular sleep positioners to keep their babies in place at night. federal officials say you should stop using them immediately. details on all of this in a few minutes. >>> plus, there are plenty of hot spots in las vegas. but this is ridiculous. the all glass facade of a new hotel is creating what some are calling a death ray at the hotel's pool that is hot enough to melt plastic. one person at the pool said he had his hair singed from the heat. more on that in a moment. >> let us begin with torrential rains and the threat of flooding on the east coast. the weather channel's jim cantore is in wilmington, north carolina, with more. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. something we haven't seen in a while, drizzle. we've had about a third of our normal rainfall we have in a year in just three days. 20 inches of rain, and you can see how high the water got here. traffic is moving now, but this is the debris line, these pine needles and leaves and whatnot because the water rose very quickly. let's take y
for us, and every election from here on. we will make improvements. >> reporter: the executive director of elections says they got to keep accurate parts right but the third issue is speed an they expect to be faster in november. >>> as you know, vincent gray beat mayor fenty and he faces no republican opposition in november. so one big question gray has been asked is whether he will keep schools chancellor rhee. bruce johnson tried to get an answer yesterday. >> reporter: will you ask her to stay or will you wait until you hear what her plans are? >> no. we are not going to make personnel decisions until after the general election. >> reporter: some gray supporters like the teachers union, want rhee ousted. some others argue she should be urged to stay on for the sake of an orderly transition. >>> now that he has conceded the race, what's next for mayor fenty? he insists he will charge ahead for the next 106 day he is still mayor and he has no other job offers a this point. he has a law degree but spent little time practicing law and got in to trouble with the dc bar when he died did -
you so much for being with us on this wednesday. we will take you to the house of representatives live next. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. today the house is working hard to get out of here, we do not know the schedule will change, but we for sure know that one of the bills on their agenda today is a discussion about compensation for 9/11 first responders who have developed health problems. thank you for being with us. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] periods [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend scott moore, doctorial student, germany. the chaplain: god of the nations, you have chosen many in various ways to show your pre
of us on the day as, you are free to wander back and get coffee. i want to thank everyone. we had a long and productive day yesterday. let me do a little housekeeping in terms of the schedule. we are supposed to have a series of three votes beginning at 11:00. so it is my intention to go without a break until those votes are called. wait until five minutes or 10 minutes into the first vote and adjourned until approximately 11:40 so everyone will have an opportunity to cast votes and we do not have to run back and forth. as soon as the third vote is cast, i will ask you to come back quickly so we can get in an hour between 11:40 and 12:40. then we will break for lunch and resume at 2:30. it is my intention to stay as late, almost as late as we did yesterday and hopefully we can get a lot more done. there was an objection yesterday come at a -- a motion by the house to admit into evidence that was 302. we have visited with our counsel and senator hatch and i have visited about it. the inclination is to not admit the 300 to as evidence for the same reasons we did not grand jury testimony in
goodness it's fox. thanks for joining us. we got three complete hours of newscasting that starts now. >> yeah, during rehearsal, it went well. hopefully it will go just as well during the live show. >> all right. breaking news overnight because this is happening in virginia. a woman has been executed for the first time in almost 100 years. theresa lewis was convicted in 2003 of plotting the murder of her husband and stepson. she apparently wanted their insurance money. she died by lethal injection. lewis' final words were for her stepdaughter. >> miss lewis did make a last statement. she said i just want kathy to know i love her. and i'm very sorry. >> protesters were outside the prison arguing that lewis was treated unfairly, apparently he was very close to the i.q. line where you're not supposed to get executed. police trying to figure out who killed a nicaraguan diplomat in his apartment in the bronx here in new york. he was found on the floor. his throat had been slashed. this just hours before he was scheduled to attend the u.n. general assembly. witnesses say there was a figh
show. jordan sparks, thank you very much for joining us live today. >> thank you very much. >> congratulations. >> see you tomorrow. bill: all right, good morning, everybody. where has time gone, huh? the health care law, signed into law, six months ago today, joe biden said it was a big bleeping deal and provisions set to take place in 24 hours that will affect millions of americans. are you one of them? is your family part of this? big bleeping deal, huh? >> martha: it was a big bleeping deal! bill: i'm bill hemmer. martha: good morning, bill, good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum. president obama will discuss the so-called patient bills of rights. this is the way it's framed today. he's going to talk to people who say they've benefitted from the health care overhaul. the president said democrats should be proud on this, when they go out campaigning in terms of the new law, but with just weeks to go before the midterm the only democrats that seem to be talking about it on the campaign trail are the ones who voted against it. bill: this may be why, new polling numb
safe on the street. thanks for joining us. i'm maureen umeh. >> and i'm will thomas. the alert comes after a couple of students have been beaten. the police ask them to protect themselves when i will they look for robbers. >> i actually got the warning on my cell phone. >> reporter: the latest robbery is a little too close for tom. police say a student walking alone there at 2 a.m. saturday was beaten and robbed by four suspects. >> i have heard about a couple of muggings before and this one is close to home. we live right over here. so it is pretty crazy. >> on august 29th, three students waiting for a bus at the university shuttle stop were approached by five suspects. a couple of the victims ran to the volunteer fire station for help. but one was assaulted and robbed. >> it seems the suspects are preying on victims during the early morning or late evening hours. >> reporter: two days before that incident, a similar one just down the street in the parking lot of the clarion hotel. this time the victims were three students who left car observing karaoke at ej's landing at 12:30 a.m.
for years and they have elected me to that. >> in new hampshire -- >> u.s. civil rights commission is holding a conference on civil rights in the 21st century and includes speeches and panel discussions on various aspects. business leaders and scholars discuss the legal and social tools available for fighting discrimination. >> including continued racial and ethnic disparities in important measures of well-being and success. this discussion obviously includes a consideration of public policy options, both old and new, but it goes beyond public policy by also asking about the limits of government action and what the right mix of government and nongovernment action should be. in a pre-conference conference call with the panel members, we identified the following questions as relevant. they don't have to answer them all, but i'm going to repeat them anyway and if they go off on more brilliant things i might turn them back to a few of these questions. first, beyond rigorous enforcement of anti-discrimination law, ca can and should be done by government to narrow racial and ethnic dispa
. and teachers who may be to blame. musician john legend, actress cheryl hynes are here. they'll tell us what we must do now so that our children have a fighting chance. a chance to overcome a crisis that threatens this nation's future. next on "larry king live." >> larry: good evening. musician john legend is an education reform activist. he wrote the song "shine" for the film "waiting for superman." his new album, "wake-up with the roots" is out now. michelle rhee is chancellor of the washington, d.c., public schools and she's featured in "waiting for superman." ben stein, the economist and former presidential speech writer, former college professor as well. steve perry is a cnn education contributor and the principal and founder of capital proprietary, a magna school. "waiting for superman" is drawing attention to the state of our public school, directed by davis guggenheim, who brought us "an inconvenient truth," the al gore film. watch. >> i want to be a nurse. >> i want to be a doctor. >> how come? >> because i would like to help somebody in need. >> you wake up every morning and you know
prison. beth holloway's attorney speaks out to us in an excluve live interview. >>> an why would she do it? that washington state woman who claims a random attacker who threw acid in her face admitting she did it herself "today," threw acid in her face admitting she did it herself "today," september 17, 2010. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good morning, welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith viera. wild weather here. >> i was in my apartment on the phone, it looked like it was 10:00 at night, it got pitch black, the wind started ed tee. >> it was like coming down in sheets. it was like being in a car wash. >> hurricane force winds ripped roofs off of houses one woman was killed when a tree crashed on to her car. we're going to have much more on this storm and the damage it left behind in just a couple of minutes. >>> a toddler trapped under icy water for more than 20 minutes when he was finally rescued. his hearwas not beating. nearly an hour later, he was brought back to life. coming up we're going to meet that boy and talk to hi
, with parents and teachers. >> wow. what does that mean? michelle rhee joins us live this hour. >>> the latest on the american hiker just freed from iranian prison and pleaing for the release of her fiancee and friend still jailed in teheran. good afternoon, everyone. andrea mill el is on assignment. primaries sending shock waves through the gop. an establishment pick has gone down in defeat. this time, the tea party candidate christine o'donnell coming out of nowhere to send congressman mike castle packing. the republicans' dream of retaking the senate may be gone, too. "the washington post" managing editor of postpolitics tonight come and also a msnbc contributor and jonathan alter is an analyst and national affairs columnist for "newsweek" magazine and author of "the promi promise." what a night in politics. unbelievable stuff. jonath jonathan, i spoke with the national senatorial committee chairman saying we are behind her, sending her the mass numb $42,000 from the committee. chairman cornyn sending her a check about his pac. what's this all disunity? [ inaudible ] chris, i can't hear jon
autographed copy and i'll see if i can get brooke to sign it as well. thank you for being with us. the very latest on thoe floods, not only down in wisconsin, but in mexico as well. "larry king live" starts right now. >> larry: tonight, a controversial new film rips america's public schools. are they cheating kids out of an education? >> i want to go to school. >> larry: betraying them with broken promises. and teacher who is may be to blame. musician john legend, actress cheryl hynes are here. they'll tell us what we must do now so that our children have a fighting chance. a chance to overcome a crisis that threatens this nation's future. next on "larry king live." >> larry: good evening. musician john legend is an education reform activist. he wrote the song "shine" for the film "waiting for superman." his new album, "wake-up with the roots" is out now. michelle rhee is chancellor of the washington, d.c., public schools and she's featured in "waiting for superman." ben stein, the economist and former presidential speech writer, former college professor as well. steve perry is a cnn educat
friends. "ac 360" and anderson cooper is next. >>> larry, thank you very much. thanks for joining us, everyone. breaking news if you live from the carolinas to cape cod, stay up with us, the first big hurricane in years to threaten the east coast is getting ready to batter it. hurricane earl, somewhat weaker than it was last night. strong enough to do some damage. close enough to be felt on the outer banks of north carolina. you can see by the surf, 12 feet and rising, according to local reports. the area already under evacuation orders. local station wact reporting that authorities are using a reverse 911 system, calling local homes, warning anyone who answers to leave. covering it all for us, chad myers tracking the storm, rob marciano in kill devil hills, north carolina, and also tonight on cape cod where the storm is expected tomorrow, susan candiotti. a lot of plans for this labor day weekend could be upset. chad myers, where is it? how bad is it? >> it is off the coast of north carolina. it would be almost due east of what we would call morehead city or just a little to the sou
if they can find a job, and save that space for hardnd criminals that put us at risk. we cannot afford to how's these people. i mean, actually some of them live better than our poor. so i hope this is a turn and i hope other states will take this on. and i really love c-span. it's so important these days. thank you so much. host: thanks for the phone call. we'll keep talking about this. but first, we want to get a quick update about the afghanistan elections. joining us on the phone is paul tate, with reuters and the afghanistan bureau chief. mr. tate, if you could tell us about the headlines that we're seing in this morning. here's one of them. afghan vote marred by irregularities. guest: good morning. it's certainly true there have been thousands of irregularities, we're told, even before voting began. thousands of voter registration cards, ink that was meant to identify people as having voted could be washed off. we even found some kids with bottles of bleach standing outside polling stations showing voters how to wash the ink off. the counting will take a very, very long time. so we're no
is crossing the table. and they are able -- their business model is basically to use the power of their monopoly or duopoly position to extract more and more revenue from folks who are dependent on this service that is essential for the transaction -- the sale of gas, the sale of grocery -- to occur. and that business model that i think we have to reward is the hard work and good service and high quality and a fair price. and our merchants, individual merchants, have no capacity to protect themselves on the cost of each transaction. and when you have electronic transactions, they are pretty simple to do. there is an expense involved. the price as charged has to be fair. and unless you have a cop on the beat -- in this case, the federal reserve writing regulations to make certain the banks don't overreach so the charges are reasonable and proportionate -- you will see merchants getting hammered with because they can't control. it eats into their profits and their viability. this i think is overdue. other countries have a much lower cost per transaction, and their economies do fi
things to recede and that is just huge, huge news for this area. still, though, some problems on u.s. 17. it is closed down in brunswick county north and south people trying to get to and from ard time doing so. power outages up now to 14,000 between north and south carolina and reports of an injury near the queens lake area as a large tree has fallen on a car. we're going to see another wave of rain this afternoon and some of it will be accompanied by winds that could gust to 50 miles per hour and that's the kind of wind, especially for the saturated soils that will take down these trees and have these power outages continuing to increase. by tomorrow we hope to have the sun back for you, something that you deserve after historic rain here in southern south carolina. back to you. >> let's go back to bill karins because he was following the track of this storm and the impact it was having. i woke up early and saw on the local news the traffic mrb prob it is causing. >> now the problems from d.c. up to new york. that is the area of concern, especially around baltimore add this time. you c
-inflicted. the attack itself did not occur as she had previously reported. >> nbc's kristen welker live for us in vancouver, washington. good morning to you. when did investigators think things weren't quite what they appeared? >> well, really, from the beginning, alex. there were a number of red flags in this case. let me just tell you what bethany storro's originally story was. she was walking in downtown vancouver and a woman she didn't recognize, an african-american woman approached her and said, hey, pretty girl, do you want to drink this and threw acid. she told police miraculously she bought a pair of sunglasses 20 minutes before this attack happened and those sunglasses protected her eyes and, therefore, she wasn't blinded. well, police say immediately there were questions. they wanted to know why the acid burns that she had only were on her face and didn't go on to her neck or shoulders, which they say would have happened if some sort of liquid would have been flashed on her. they want to know why she was wearing sunglasses at night. another when bethany canceled an appearance with op
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